THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING BAND-A Degradation Theory

"...my music is perfect, you could go back to Beethoven and s***, but as far as this lifetime, though, this is all you got." -Kanye West Since the Second Industrial Age began in the late 19th century, human civilization has been continuously shaped and reshaped by notable advancements in technology. With every relevant invention or improved method of production, merchants scurried for the latest competitive edge while their customers rushed the market in search of Read more

ROOM TO BREATHE (Chase The Sample Super-Mix)

Wooooooooo, this is fun!  When it comes to music, I love taking a concept as far as it can go, so the 'Room To Breathe (Chase the Sample Super-Mix)' is a perfect example of my arguably unhealthy obsession with developing a good theme to its full conclusion.  In the past, it was 'Meatshake' or 'Einstein Buys a Monkey' but in 2016, I came up with the idea of singling out an element from my Read more

ROOM TO BREATHE-The Free LP

I am very pleased to announce that Unique Records will be releasing my first ever solo album 'ROOM TO BREATHE-The Free LP'.  This record contains ten, high-velocity, Hip-Hop tracks for listeners who enjoy intricate, action-packed rhyming skill showcased over fresh loops and funky drums.  Lyrically, I pushed myself as far as I could go with regard to style, pace and feel and the result, in my untrustworthy opinion, is a seriously cool collection of Read more

THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING BAND-A Degradation Theory

Posted on by andycooper in ANDY'S ANGLE, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
historic music groups

Thinning personnel of musical outfits over the past 100 years (starting from the upper-left): The Philadelphia Orchestra (1916), The Duke Ellington Orchestra (1937), The Dave Clark 5 (1964), The Ramones (1977), LL Cool J (1986), DJ Pauly D (somewhere in Miami Beach right now)

“…my music is perfect, you could go back to Beethoven and s***, but as far as this lifetime, though, this is all you got.” -Kanye West

Since the Second Industrial Age began in the late 19th century, human civilization has been continuously shaped and reshaped by notable advancements in technology. With every relevant invention or improved method of production, merchants scurried for the latest competitive edge while their customers rushed the market in search of goods that made life more comfortable and convenient.  As horse-drawn buggies gave way to Volkswagen Bugs and telegrams became text messages, the music business also updated its methods for delivering songs to listeners.  Starting with Thomas Edison’s phonograph in 1877, recorded music has been continuously manufactured for the public in constantly updated and increasingly cost-efficient forms.  From wax cylinders to vinyl discs to open reels to cassette tapes to compact discs to MP3’s, the means by which we listen to music has become less expensive to manufacture and easier to access.  While most of us love cheap and easy, it might be worth asking what, when it comes to our music, we may have given up for the sake of expediency. Read more

ROOM TO BREATHE (Chase The Sample Super-Mix)

Posted on by andycooper in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Wooooooooo, this is fun!  When it comes to music, I love taking a concept as far as it can go, so the ‘Room To Breathe (Chase the Sample Super-Mix)’ is a perfect example of my arguably unhealthy obsession with developing a good theme to its full conclusion.  In the past, it was ‘Meatshake’ or ‘Einstein Buys a Monkey’ but in 2016, I came up with the idea of singling out an element from my song ‘Room To Breathe’ and creating what you might call a sample-chain which links that particular part to a bevy of other Hip-Hop classic like a giant line of falling dominoes.  Of course, you would probably need to be a well-schooled aficionado of Golden Era Rap to really appreciate what is being presented but, even if there’s only eight who care about stuff like this, this is seriously cool.

For my late 80’s/early 90’s people, I challenge you to follow this funk family tree from James Brown to the end of the bloodline and pick out all the different audio-bites to determine why one leads to another; believe me, they’re all connected.  Some bits sampled the bit heard right before while other clips share a common sample ancestor with the following clip; see how this works?  The first three people who can give me a complete list of all the samples that play from 0:22 to 3:30 and explain the chain will receive a signed ‘Room To Breathe’ 7″ single which I’ll personally mail to their home along with enough cash to buy a snack.   

I’ll get you started:

Jame’s Brown’s ‘Blind Man Can See It’ was sampled by Das EFX on ‘They want EFX’ which sampled EPMD’s ‘Underground’ which sampled Grover Washington’s ‘Hydra’ which was sampled by A Tribe Called Quest on ‘Check The Rhime’ which sampled Biz Markie’s ‘Nobody Beats The Biz’ which sampled Steve Miller’s ‘Fly Like An Eagle’ which was sampled by EPMD’s ‘You’re A Customer’…get the picture?

Here’s the link to download this track: https://uglyduckling.bandcamp.com/track/room-to-breathe-chase-the-sample-super-mix

 

 

DO YOU NEED TO BE REAL TO BE REAL?

Posted on by andycooper in Uncategorized | 5 Comments
slim

Slim Jesus spreading his gospel

kayu

Ready to die?

Recently (and unfortunately), I found myself watching Hip-Hop journalist DJ Vlad’s interview of ‘Slim Jesus’, a 19-year-old, white rapper from suburban Ohio.  Slim Jesus has recently experienced a jolt of success from his half-tempo, ode to gun-wagging called ‘Drill Time’ and the accompanying video which features him and his buddies pointing lasered-up glocks and techs toward their cameraman.  On ‘Drill Time’, Slim, who some have mockingly compared to the cartoon character ‘Caillou’, brags incessantly about his vast collection of firearms and a gleeful willingness to use them before delivering his final line:

Ain’t afraid to catch a body and skip out from state to state/
and if there’s a witness, I’mma kill ’em too and I’mma beat the case

Now, there’s really nothing new or shocking about a song like ‘Drill Time’ and one could comfortably make the argument that Slim Jesus’s brand of tough-talk has become passé in Hip-Hop culture; I wouldn’t disagree.  But, I did find one thing particularly refreshing about Slim Jesus which brings me back to the interview I referenced above.  When DJ Vlad quizzed him about street credentials, Slim happily admitted that he had absolutely no connection to crime.  In fact, SJ laughed off the idea of being involved in street work as “Stupid” saying, “I make music and I’m not out here doing some dumb shit trying to ruin what I got goin'”.  When asked why he rapped about guns and murder, Slim unashamedly and inarticulately leveled with his interviewer, “That shit is dope.  If i rapped about driving around in a car and listening to country music, no one would give a fuck about that shit.  I make music about shit that sounds cool”.

Of course, the notoriety of ‘Drill Time’ and Slim Jesus’s admitted lack of street credibility quickly led to a backlash from so-called, ‘real’ street artists like ‘Lil’ Mouse’, ‘Chief Keef’ and, most famously, ‘The Game’ who kindly expressed a fear for ‘Slim’s’ safety lamenting, “Lives can be lost playing those games, be careful Slim Jesus”.  In one sense, I can completely understand any negative reaction caused by a fully fabricated ‘Gangsta’ act and, particularly, the resentment felt by folks who actually endure the dangers of a criminal life.  On the other hand, am I to believe that most ‘Gangsta’ rappers actually live out the lyrics in their songs?  And the bigger question, should they?

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